(Given Back The) Kingdom

I have to admit that it’s a little baffling to now have songs in my repertoire that are now ten years old. This is one such example – I wrote Kingdom some time in 2006/2007, one of the first songs composed for my old band the Lazy Lizards (who were then rather painfully called Los Crocodilos).

This performance is a very basic iteration captured last December while on holiday in southern Egypt. We were staying at Fekra, a cultural centre dedicated to championing the cultural heritage of the Nubian people of Egypt and Sudan. Fekra’s living room has a hexagonal design which provides a really nice acoustic sound. I spent a couple of night’s jamming with my friend Watter al Bahry, who plays the daff (دُفْ in Arabic). Kingdom sounded really good – so we spontaneously decided to record it. It was only the second time Watter had heard the song, thus the simple arrangement. My wife also started adding a little tambourine, before thinking better of it!

When I used to perform Kingdom with the Lazy Lizards it was a far greater beast. We recorded the version you can hear above in our very first studio session for our first EP. Our skills playing, arranging and recording were still coming together, so there are a few rough edges. The studio was a temporary set-up in a grand old Victorian house in Moseley, Birmingham, which was being rented by eight young musicians. As a result, the living room we set up in was full with about a dozen different drums from around the world the tenants had collected, and we resolved to use all of them in the extended outro to the song. You can even hear the sound of a jam jar of nails smashing at the close of the kit solo, as the vibrations of the drums shook the jar off the mantelpiece more or less in time.

Kingdom became a feature over most of our gigs across three years, and evolved out of the amorphous recorded version into a closely scripted mini-samba. It also blossomed into a different song, as the basis of Set Sail While The Ship Still Floats is simply an extension of Kingdom’s groove with an extra chord added.

samba-lizards-kingdom
the samba break-down at the end of this performance included drum kit, cajon, timpany, djembe, bongos, clave, bells, handclaps and shouts!

I wrote the song shortly after leaving Uni, where my subject had been African Studies. As well as influencing the musical component of Kingdom, this also led the direction of the lyrics. The song addresses the hypocrisy of the end of the colonial era in Africa, where the Western powers made a great show of granting independence to their African territories even as the legacies they left ensured the failure of these new states. A number of African animals appear throughout the song, most importantly the lion as an emblem of Africa’s pride, power and potential.

(Given Back The) Kingdom

Verse 1

My rivers don’t run no more

This eagle don’t care to soar

And this thirsty, skin and bone lion

Don’t have tongue to roar

Verse 2

I go in search of shade

Kneel and pray for aid

But no help come, these dry tears falls

The lion flees in dismay

Chorus

Given back the kingdom, you gonna call this freedom

Given back the kingdom, you gonna call this freedom

You know that giving back a skin

That’s not giving back anything

Is your conscience spread so thin?

Would you dare compound this sin?

Verse 3

A forest lying on its side

Men do what the termites tried

 Gone the trees and gone the beasts

The lion don’t have no pride

Verse 4

The half-moon shining pale

The harvest once again has failed

And the jackals, wolves and snakes

Lie hungry on the lion’s tail

Chorus

Given back the kingdom, you gonna call this freedom

Given back the kingdom, you gonna call this freedom

Because giving back a skin

That’s not giving back anything

Is your conscience spread so thin?

Would you dare compound this sin?

Outro

Mosquito buzz, hyena leer, the vulture flap and the baboon cheer

Mosquito buzz, hyena leer, the vulture flap and the baboon cheer

(Given Back The) Kingdom

1m4s Day 23: Nile Projects

philae-temple-morning

With just over a week left of 1 month, 4 songs, the likelihood of success is beginning to dwindle. At my half-way point, I noted my holidays were coming, and that I’d have more time to put into my songs. It’s a myth I’ve fallen for before, because of course time on holiday is spent being on holiday. Though I’ve had some productive songwriting sessions since I left Cairo, more time’s been spent travelling, exploring and enjoying what Upper Egypt has to offer.

Today did see a good songwriting session though, as we spent the day chilling at Fekra, a (rather dilapidated) cultural centre celebrating Nubian heritage. While the rooms don’t offer much to celebrate, the view is a cause for celebration; a stretch of the Nile dotted by rocky islands, framing Philae Temple, one of the wonders of Ancient Egypt rescued and rebuilt after dams harnessed the might of the river. Fekra was the site of one the Nile Project’s residencies – a musical project/evolving band that brings together the different musical traditions of the people who live along the longest river in the world. It’s a band I’ve followed since before I came to Egypt, and with their music in mind and the fantastic vista it was easy to feel inspired.

I turned my attention to two songs. When The City Is Home now has verses, choruses and a bridge, although only the latter has music I’m set on. I experimented with some different ideas with the verse and the chorus, nothing quite fit. I gave up before I started feeling too frustrated, though in retrospect wonder whether this was premature. With songwriting you’re always on the verge of a major breakthrough or a minor breakdown, and it’s never clear how close you are to which.

The other song I worked on was Bold Little Weasel, which has pulled ahead of the other songs in terms of progress. At this stage I more or less know how the song goes and what the various parts consist of, though there are some holes in the lyrics here and there. With my friend Watter Al Bahry playing the duff, I made the short demo above of the bridge and a section of the verse. The living room at Fekra has a hexagonal design, which creates a really warm acoustic sound.

The Nile’s influence will continue to be felt over the next few days, as I will spend them on rather than next to the water. We’ll be sailing aboard a felucca – a traditional Egyptian boat for the next five days, and the pace of life will really, really slow down, though I hope I’ll still be able to fit in a little songwriting alongside doing nothing. Am I, after all, on holiday.

philae-temple-evening

 

1m4s Day 23: Nile Projects